Archive for July, 2016

Talking or writing, keep it short

You will lose your audience if you insist on rattling on in your speaking or your writing.
If you’re speaking, you need to make your points in 10-18 minutes. Otherwise, the audience loses  attention and you lose a great chance to spread your message. Scientists find that many listeners lose focus and tune out speakers after 10 minutes. TED talks, which showcase major league speakers, are limited to 18 minutes on the theory that this is enough time to explain the essence of your subject.

Writing on linkedin.com, Carmine Gallo has more thoughts and information:

“The 18-minute rule also works because the brain is an energy hog. The average adult human brain only weighs about three pounds, but it consumes an inordinate amount of glucose, oxygen, and blood flow. As the brain takes in new information and is forced to process it, millions of neurons are firing at once, burning energy and leading to fatigue and exhaustion. Researchers at Texas Christian University are finding that the act of listening can be as equally draining as thinking hard about a subject. Dr. Paul King calls it “cognitive backlog.” Like weights, he says, the more information we are asked to take in, the heavier and heavier it gets. Eventually, we drop it all, failing to remember anything we’ve been told.”

The same goes for writing. Don’t waste time and pixels on matters unnecessary to your story. If you do, your audience will move on without you.

Get the full details at Gallo’s post:

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20140313205730-5711504-the-science-behind-ted-s-18-minute-rule