Archive for December, 2011

Tips on how to make your message connect

 

Whether speaking or writing, we need to draw connections and craft messages that reach our audience. Otherwise, it’s just blather.

On Harvard Business Review Blogs, Kare Anderson offers some excellent ideas for getting an audience’s attention in a businesslike way — be sharp, be colorful, kill the jargon:  blogs.hbr.org/cs/2011/12/craft_an_attention-grabbing_me.html

12 tips for p.r. success

Plan, communicate, don’t be defensive.

These are just a few of the many things you need to do if you want public relations to work for your business.

Twelve tips right here, thanks to Amy Tobin: www.prdaily.com/Main/Articles/10437.aspx

 

 

BP making people forget its spill

When it comes to making lemonade out of lemons, BP gets high marks for its all-out campaign to make America forget about the oil spill that fouled the Gulf of Mexico in 2010.

BP ads for Gulf Coast beaches are ubiquitous in northern markets, but Pensacolians won’t soon forget how BP’s bungling cost many people their livelihoods and threatened the environment.

mediabistro.com/prnewser/top-5-cases-of-pr-lemons-to-lemonade-in-2011_b31931

Cure your site’s lack of attention

 

There’s a lull at most offices this week as folks sleepwalk between Christmas and New Year’s Day.

Take a few minutes to look at your website, your blog and other media.

You may be stunned to see how long it’s been since you updated your site. It’s especially embarassing if you’re in the communications business or trying to reach new customers while retaining current customers..

Sure, you’ve been busy, but a stagnant site or blog turns off visitors who could be making you even busier and richer.

“Wow,” they say, “Nothing new posted here since August. Of ’09.”

There’s a solution, even if you don’t want to do the work yourself or, better yet, hire someone (i.e., me!) to do it for you:

Make the site or blog an “evergreen,” which means your material doesn’t go out of date. It’s generic, but at least you can make it informative, and visitors won’t be noticing how many months elapse between posts.

Startup uses p.r. to build name

 

To build awareness for her new startup, Caroline Limpert is banking on public relations.

She’s already finding that p.r. offers credibility, speed and a lot more than just the traditional media.

www.inc.com/caroline-limpert/public-relations-strategy-why-I-bet-on-PR.html

 

Stay on message when writing a book

 

Veteran ghostwriter Dennis Lowery follows a checklist of items to help someone write a book or memoir, which can be a daunting task for an inexperienced writer.

Some key points in planning the book:

  • What is the main topic for my Book?
  • What is the main message regarding the topic that I want to thread throughout the Book?
  • What are the major “take-away” points I want the reader to get from reading my Book?

You can find more at his site www.DMLowery.com

I’ve found many of his tips very valuable as I help others write their books.

Business a big target for bloggers

 

Bloggers aren’t just guys issuing political rants from their parents’ spare room.

More and more, bloggers are becoming professional and exerting more weight with consumers. So don’t write them all off as kooks. Some have followings and influence significant numbers of people who may be your customers.

A new survey shows a large chunk of bloggers post on business matters, and consumers tend to trust blogs more than Facebook or Twitter, according to this report. www.socialmediaexaminer.com/7-reasons-to-rethink-your-blogging-strategy-new-research/

 

 

 

 

P.R. gains as newspapers lose

More businesses must turn to public relations professionals because newspapers are shedding staffers who used to write the stories.

P.R. professionals can find alternate ways to create public awareness for people and products that shrinking newspapers no longer cover.

Journalism jobs are dwindling rapidly, with fewer now than in 1978.

www.prdaily.com/Main/Articles/10388.aspx

How to introduce yourself best

Answer these four questions within a minute and you have the makings of a sales presentation that succeeds.

1. What do you do?
2. What problem do you solve?
3. How is your product or service different?
4. Why should I care?

As consultant Carmine Gallo notes, too many people blather when asked about their businesses. They tell lame jokes and ramble on.

Get to the point and the listener will remember you.

www.entrepreneur.com/article/222439?utm_campaign=Feed:+entrepreneur/latest+(Entrepreneur)

You can get good p.r. like Santa

When it comes to good feelings, no one generates more positive karma than Santa Claus.

These tips apply to all businesses, not just public relations, so check out the list and your business can be nicer next year.

http://www.linkedin.com/news?actionBar=&articleID=989005774&ids=c3cVc34QczAVb3wSe30TdP4VeiMQdPsRc30Ve3AIczcRcz4OczwVb3AMc38Qdj8VeiMMdz0Me3sOejAIdjsVd3cNc3wV&aag=true&freq=weekly&trk=eml-tod2-b-ttl-4&ut=0Q7vRTBol9PR01